Finished object – Isambard Socks

15-05-19 complete socks

I had a bit of a knitting frenzy over the weekend and finished my Isambard socks. I have small feet and my socks don’t take long to knit if I work on them consistently. I love seeing all the amazing sock patterns that other people knit, but I only like knitting plain ones myself. I have no idea why that should be unless it is because I love my socks to be wildly coloured or have tons of variegation and those type of yarns just don’t play nicely with patterning. Or perhaps I am just lazy (actually, no perhaps needed there).

I have been knitting my socks for the past couple of years on 2.5mm needles, but I am coming to the conclusion that I might go down to 2.25mm for my next pair. I think I used 2.25mm when I first started knitting socks and they lasted rather better than my more recent socks, not that the more recent socks are problematic in any way.

I really enjoy how this wool knits up and the dyeing is very pleasing to the eye. Those blues and golds on the grey-beige background make me very happy.

Technical details:

Pattern:  Vanilla sock based on free pattern circa 2006/2007, came free with a ball of sock wool
Size: To fit UK size 4 1/2 shoe
Materials: Mr B sock yarn 75% superwash wool/25% nylon, 100g (I usually use around 55g)
Needles:  2.5mm KnitPro Zing metal double-point needles, 20cm long, pack of 5 (I use 4 with half the stitches on one needle, and a quarter each on a further two needles, working the live stitches onto the fourth needle)

The pattern I follow has a heel flap and gusset construction which suits me very well. The toe in the pattern is pretty standard, decreasing equal amounts on both sides until 12 stitches remain on both needles, then doing a Kitchener Stitch join. I learned how to do the Kitchener join using the knitting needles instead of having to thread up a tapestry needle and that made a lot of sense to me. However, last year I discovered the Barn Toe which gives a slightly deeper and more rounded toe shape and I like that a lot so I used it on this pair.

15-05-19 barn toe

I particularly enjoy the fact that with this toe shaping you just keep decreasing until you only have four stitches left and then you cinch them shut using the end of your working yarn. It is so quick to do and there’s none of that inclination to stop just short of the end because you need to look up the Kitchener instructions again.

As well as finishing these, I have made significant progress on my Inigo cardigan. I have all-but completed the back and have made a start on one of the sleeves. I thought, as my gauge is not exactly as per the pattern, it made sense to wait to finish the armhole shaping on the back until I had a sleeve complete so I can make sure that the pieces fit together well. Forethought – that’s a new one for me!

Whilst I was working on the Gaudi cardigan I logged it on Ravelry. I have been very lazy about Ravelry for quite a number of years, rarely using it and not logging any of my projects, although there was a time when I was quite diligent with it. Now I am suddenly getting back into using it to keep the project details and I am enjoying it once again.

There has been one drawback to my knitting endeavours this past week, which is that one of my fingers has developed a slightly alarming ‘click’. I have consulted Dr. Internet who informs me this is “trigger finger” (sounds like it is a surfeit of Kojak rather than knitting that has caused it) and since I am not in pain and my finger merely feels odd rather than actually seizing up, I am limiting the amount I work on my knitting for a few days to give it a rest.

I hope you have enjoyed seeing my finished socks and I hope your knitting, or other creative endeavours, are going well. For now, I think it’s time to have a nice cup of tea.


 

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2 comments

  1. Thanks – I’ve been really pleased with the socks I’ve knitted with the Mr B Yarns and slightly sad that this was the last skein of it. I need to earn some money so I can buy some more!

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