Prescience

Not a quote of the week, but a word of the week:

Prescience (noun) – foreknowledge/foresight

I’ve been working hard on my knitting through the week and I am getting very close to completing the knitting part.

15-03-19 knit
The Wheatfields sleeveless pullover

I am very pleased with how this is looking. I plan to finish it with a simple crochet neckband and armbands to neaten up the edges. I still love the cream wool and I can imagine it knit up as a cricket jumper, the kind I wanted pretty much all through the 1980s. It would also be ideal for some of Marion Foales’ old 1980s patterns.

I thought I was having a day of procrastination yesterday as I spent far too much time sorting out old files on my computer’s external hard drive. Mainly it involved getting rid of innumerable duplicates/triplicates/infini-plicates! It was only when I sat down to do my creative writing later on in the evening that I realised how useful some of those unearthed items were. I came across some old snippets of writing from 2006 and the style I had used to write them entirely suited a couple of the characters in my novel.

Back in 2006 I wrote the following:

But you know these observations about these things I own and how I use them, they are all part of the back-story of me and when I create characters I need them to have this kind of back-story. Understanding how a person interacts with their possessions is incredibly useful for a writer. Or for one who is simply interested in human character.

Well, there I was, thirteen years later, using those observations to provide the back-story for a character in my novel. Now if that isn’t prescient, then I don’t know what is!


Have you had any experience of a thing that has taken a long time to reach fruition? I’d love to hear.

I remember my mum planting a rowan tree in our garden when I was a young girl and all the years when she watched it fail to put forth any kind of perceptible growth. I recall how it suddenly spurted with life the year she decided it was going to be dug up and scrapped if it didn’t make an effort before the autumn. Things can be like that.


 

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Pamela Boxall

A highly imaginative approach to literature (and to life in general) can lead to imprecision.

2 thoughts on “Prescience”

  1. As a gardener, I often have the experience that some things take a long time to get to what you envisaged — while some never do, and others become so strong they start to to overwhelm everything else and have to be cut back. I suspect that is a metaphor for life, but I haven’t had enough coffee yet, so I bequeath it to you to “unearth” whether anything I’ve just typed has any use, much less makes any sense. 🙂

  2. Yes, I’m sure there are a lot of gardening analogies. Both my older sisters inherited our mum’s love of gardening, whereas I took after our dad in thinking the garden was a nice thing for other people to look after. I think my brother is rather like me in that respect. I am pretty sure a lot of what I am writing at present will have to be pruned, but I’m enjoying writing it and I’m a long way from the cutting-back stage, so I can pretty safely ignore it at present.

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